Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

 

Everyone worries, but for some people it can become a real problem. GAD is a condition charatcerised by persistent worry, that effects a persons daily life. A person suffering from this problem is likely to be anxious about a great many things, rather than one specific event. Many will become fixated on 'worst case scenarios' and struggle to tolerate any uncertainty. This can have a negative impact on the relationships they have with people around them. For example, friends and family may become highly critical of them and feel they are 'creating problems'. The impact of GAD can be underestimated and often goes undiagonised.  

Tired depressed bored african businessma

Common symptoms

The symptoms of GAD can be very similar to those associated with other anxiety problems. It can therefore easily be misdiagnosed. Here are some common symptoms associated with GAD:

  • Excessive worry about a variety of different topics and/or activities.

  • Muscle tension and aching (especially in the shoulders, neck and head).

  • Difficulty making decisions due to anxiety about making the 'right choice'.

  • Problems delegating tasks/work, wanting to do everything yourself. ​

  • An intolerance to uncertainty.

  • ​Overthinking plans and activities.

Treatment for GAD

The evidence-base (research and results from clinical trials) recommend a course of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for the treatment of GAD. This will involve first identifying the beliefs and behaviours that maintain your worries, and secondly learning techniques to help you overcome the problem.

For most, a course of between twelve to sixteen therapy hours, will be enough for people to feel that they can successfully meet their goals. However, some may need a more intensive and prolonged treatment, depending on the severity of their symptoms.

At NOSA we will take time to asses your individual needs and work in collaboration with you to recommend a treatment package that best meets your goals.

Helpful resources

https://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/Resources/Looking-After-Yourself/Worry-and-Rumination

Helpful website with self-help workbooks and information